Holidays

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How To Keep Your Cat Safe During The Holidays

https://youtu.be/W1wj7UDg6AA How To Keep Your Cat Safe During The Holidays We are going to talk to you today about Thanksgiving and cats. Because we do this every single year. Cats like turkey. We do this every year. So if you have any questions, feel free to just ask them right away so we can get to them because we have to make this a little bit short because Ellen has to go to the store because she's going to brave the grocery store a day before Thanksgiving FOOD SAFETY So first, one of the most important things about Thanksgiving safety is the food because there are a lot of foods cats should not eat at Thanksgiving.And it's always the day after the holiday where you see the most emergencies that are food related, unfortunately.So the most important things for your cats to not eat during Thanksgiving are the turkey bones, onion, garlic, raisins, grapes. I don't know a lot of Thanksgiving dishes with grapes, but--Also, those people still get those gigantic fruit baskets with grapes in them.Oh, yeah. That's a good point. Don't eat grapes. Well, you should. Don't let your cats eat grapes. And chocolate. Anything that's made with sorbitol or aspartame. Don't do that. What else am I forgetting? I'm sure I'm forgetting something. Pretty much just give your cat turkey meat. If that's what you want to do, that's the safest thing but in moderation. Stay away from the skins. NOVA Cat Clinic did post just a few days ago one of our safety sheets that we normally do on what you can and cannot give to your cats. Go ahead and refer back to that. It'll give you kind of like [...]

By | November 30th, 2018|Holidays|0 Comments

Update: Advise For Halloween And Your Cat

This is an update from a few years ago. Don’t we all love Halloween?  It is so much fun, but we need to be careful for our cats. Some candy can be toxic to cats.  How can something so wonderful be dangerous? Chocolate especially the darker types is toxic to cats.  Chocolate has caffeine and theobromine. When ingested, these two ingredients can lead to various medical complications and may even prove fatal for your cat. The artificial sweetener, xylitol is also toxic to cats. The ingestion of xylitol primarily affects insulin release throughout the body. Xylitol causes the release of insulin from the pancreas into circulation leading to a rapid decrease of blood glucose levels. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) can occur within 30 to 60 minutes of xylitol ingestion. This hypoglycemia can lead to liver toxicity, liver damage, and ultimately liver failure. Xylitol is perfectly safe for people, but because of different metabolisms, it can be fatal for dogs and cats. So be careful to not let candy be lying around or fall out of your trick or treat bag Clikc here for a link to the ASPCA hotline Some cats love to play and then eat dangling decorations.  Just make sure the decorations are out of reach. Vomiting is the most common sign of foreign bodies.  We want to be sure you do not spend the holiday in the emergency room. Although we think of this more during the winter holidays, there are those of us who go all out for Halloween too. Be sure and stop by the clinic to see the decorations in effect. If you have outdoor cats, you may want to consider limiting their outdoor time during this period.  This is [...]

By | September 26th, 2018|Holidays|0 Comments

Cats And Lilies Do Not Mix

Spring is around the corner.  All of us here at NOVA Cat Clinic want to make sure that your cat is safe during the spring holiday season. We try to bring awareness that Lilies are EXTREMELY toxic to cats. If you have a cat, do NOT have any lilies in you house.  Even the pollen is toxic.  We will have links to previous years post for further information. All parts of the lily plant are dangerous, including the flowers, stamens, stems, leaves and roots – even the pollen. If a cat gets pollen on its coat and then grooms, it could still cause fatal illness. Cats that get pollen on themselves should be thoroughly bathed as soon as possible. Most of the time we figure out that our cat has eaten lilies when we find a piece on the floor. Sometimes it is in a pile of vomit. When it comes to lilies, it is imperative that you seek emergency medical treatment for your cat as soon as possible to ensure proper and effective treatment. In approximately 2-4 days after ingestion of the plant, your cat may begin to show signs of kidney failure. If enough toxin is absorbed to cause acute kidney failure, then the likelihood that your cat will respond to treatment is poor. A cat affected by lily intoxication will initially show signs of an upset stomach, vomiting, a lack of interest in food, and lethargy. These initial signs may appear within 2-12 hours of ingestion and may disappear after 12 hours. The cat may improve briefly or appear to act normal before the condition progresses to serious acute renal failure within 48 to 72 hours. Once a cat’s kidneys have been damaged to the point [...]

What Do You Do With Your Cat When You Are On Vacation?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzLuOPnULoc Dr Barron and Ellen will try to help you with your cat(s) when you go on vacation. "It's vacation time." What does that mean for you and your cats? So Ellen why don't you jump off and talk about cats and vacation and maybe what things you should think about before you go on vacation. And we can give you some tips on if you decide you want to take your cat with you on vacation. Right. Preparation is always the key before you decide to take your cat on vacation. Number one, does your hotel allow it? Do your family members allow it? Is your cat a good traveler, etc.? Because you have to think about the pet first, even though you may want your cat to travel with you. Your cat may want to have nothing to do with this kind of travel because it is super stressed. So if your cat is not the world's best traveler, and you're only traveling for a short period of time, perhaps they shouldn't go on vacation with you versus if you do have a cat that's wonderful in the car, easily adapts to any situation within moments then, yeah, that's probably the kind of cat that would love to go travel and hang out with you. Kind of like when you see the new Camping with Cats and The Adventure Cats, it's those ones, I love them. I love the camping with the cats' website. I think it's so cool. Side note here, if you're going to take your cat on a trip, you need to have it on flea prevention, period. Yeah. And have a microchip and have harness and all that other fun of stuff. And please make [...]

The Holidays Are Upon Us

Love the holidays? From Halloween to New Years, we at NOVA Cat Clinic want to keep your kitty healthy year round so want to make you aware of some of the most common kitty threats that come out this time of year. Food Chocolate especially the darker types is toxic to cats.  Chocolate has caffeine and theobromine. When ingested, these two ingredients can lead to various medical complications and may even prove fatal for your cat. The artificial sweetener, xylitol is also toxic to cats. The ingestion of xylitol primarily affects insulin release throughout the body. Xylitol causes the release of insulin from the pancreas into circulation leading to a rapid decrease of blood glucose levels. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) can occur within 30 to 60 minutes of xylitol ingestion. This hypoglycemia can lead to liver toxicity, liver damage, and ultimately liver failure. Xylitol is perfectly safe for people, but because of different metabolisms, it can be fatal for dogs and cats.   Plants Poinsettias – These festive holiday plants can cause mouth irritation and possible vomiting if ingested. Holly – Found frequently around the holiday season, this plant may cause vomiting, diarrhea, and lethargy. Pine Needles – They always seem to be falling off the Christmas tree and may look like an appealing toy to a kitty. If ingested they can cause oral irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy and weakness. Mistletoe – Waiting for that special someone to meet you under the mistletoe? Your kitty might be waiting too, but for a tasty snack to fall. If ingested, mistletoe can cause vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, and unusual behavior. Lily – These beautiful flowers can easily be found year round, but also make appearances in holiday bouquets. Even one leaf from a lily [...]

Can My Cat Drink Wine?

Can Cats Drink Wine? Cats should not drink wine.  There is now a new novelty product that your cat can drink with you while you enjoy your wine. The good folks at apollopeak.com in Colorado have developed new catnip drink for your cat.  We are going to have Emmy and Buddy let us know what they think.  If they give their seal of approval, we are planning on having it available for you to  purchase. Apollo Peak has an FAQ if you would like to learn more - click here.

By | October 14th, 2016|Holidays|0 Comments

Candy Can Be Dandy Unless You Are A Cat

Don’t we all love Halloween?  It is so much fun, but we need to be careful for our cats. Some candy can be toxic to cats.  How can something so wonderful be dangerous? Chocolate especially the darker types is toxic to cats.  Chocolate has caffeine and theobromine. When ingested, these two ingredients can lead to various medical complications and may even prove fatal for your cat. The artificial sweetener, xylitol is also toxic to cats. The ingestion of xylitol primarily affects insulin release throughout the body. Xylitol causes the release of insulin from the pancreas into circulation leading to a rapid decrease of blood glucose levels. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) can occur within 30 to 60 minutes of xylitol ingestion. This hypoglycemia can lead to liver toxicity, liver damage, and ultimately liver failure. Xylitol is perfectly safe for people, but because of different metabolisms, it can be fatal for dogs and cats. So be careful to not let candy be lying around or fall out of your trick or treat bag Clikc here for a link to the ASPCA hotline Some cats love to play and then eat dangling decorations.  Just make sure the decorations are out of reach. Vomiting is the most common sign of foreign bodies.  We want to be sure you do not spend the holiday in the emergency room. Although we think of this more during the winter holidays, there are those of us who go all out for Halloween too. Be sure and stop by the clinic to see the decorations in effect. If you have outdoor cats, you may want to consider limiting their outdoor time during this period.  This is especially true for black cats. Unfortunately, not everyone loves cats [...]

By | October 5th, 2015|Community, Holidays|0 Comments

Lilies – Deadly to Cats

Easter is upon us. We will all be outside enjoying ourselves and the beautiful weather. Soon we will see the beautiful white trumpet-shaped Easter lilies that appear everywhere this time of year. Unfortunately, for those of us with cats, these flowers are deadly. Easter lilies (Lilium longiflorum) are incredibly poisonous to cats. All lilies are toxic. All parts of the lily plant are dangerous, including the flowers, stamens, stems, leaves and roots – even the pollen. If a cat gets pollen on its coat and then grooms, it could still cause fatal illness. Cats that get pollen on themselves should be thoroughly bathed as soon as possible.   Most of the time we figure out that our cat has eaten lilies when we find a piece on the floor. Sometimes it is in a pile of vomit. When it comes to lilies, it is imperative that you seek emergency medical treatment for your cat as soon as possible to ensure proper and effective treatment. In approximately 2-4 days after ingestion of the plant, your cat may begin to show signs of kidney failure. If enough toxin is absorbed to cause acute kidney failure, then the likelihood that your cat will respond to treatment is poor. A cat affected by lily intoxication will initially show signs of an upset stomach, vomiting, a lack of interest in food, and lethargy. These initial signs may appear within 2-12 hours of ingestion and may disappear after 12 hours. The cat may improve briefly or appear to act normal before the condition progresses to serious acute renal failure within 48 to 72 hours. Once a cat’s kidneys have been damaged to the point of failure, they will show a variety [...]

Meowy Catmus

Whether it’s Hanukkah, Solstice, Christmas, or New Year’s Eve, the holiday season offers plenty of opportunities for celebration…and opportunities for your cat to experience stress.  Visitors, new decorations, loud noises, and changes in routine can all be sources of stress for your kitty.   Here are a few ways to keep your feline companions relaxed and comfortable this holiday season.   When possible, stick to a routine. Cats tend to be creatures of habit.  They always seem to know when something is different in their daily routine.  In my house, any delay in the morning ritual leads to my cat peering around the corner waiting to decide if she needs to run under the bed in case the cat carrier is brought out.  Try to keep feeding times, play time, and other parts of your schedule as close to normal as possible during the hustle and bustle of holiday preparations and travel.   Speaking of travel, keep your cat’s personality in mind when deciding on holiday travel plans.  Some cats have no problem hopping in the car and riding to Grandma’s house to hang out with other cats, dogs, and kids. Others would prefer to be in a boarding facility where they can have their own private kennel but still enjoy lots of human attention and the companionship of other cats. Other cats are most comfortable at home and don’t mind being visited by a petsitter once or twice daily.   Keep holiday decorations as safe as possible for your cat. Plants, candles, tinsel, and other items can be dangerous. See our blog post HERE for more information.   Make it easy for your cat to get away from the excitement. Some cats love to [...]

By | December 12th, 2014|Holidays|0 Comments